Thomas H. Sullivan

Attorney at Law

Beneficiaries

My Loved One Has Died: As an Heir or Beneficiary, Do I Need an Attorney?

Posted on: January 30th, 2021
You just found out that your favorite aunt, Aunt Melba, has died. In the midst of your grief and sadness, you receive a notice from the attorney handling Aunt Melba's affairs stating that you are a beneficiary. Your best friend advises you to get an attorney. What should you do? Will Aunt Melba's attorney help you? After all, Aunt Melba's attorney has been helping your family for years. Since this attorney knows Melba and the family affairs, shouldn't her attorney be able to help you as well?...

You Inherited a Retirement Account

Posted on: December 21st, 2020
It is increasingly common for an IRA or 401k to be the highest value item of property that an American owns. For purposes of estate planning, however, it is important to understand that very special rules apply to these types of accounts. Gone are the days when you can write up a quick will or trust and be assured that everything you own will pass to your heirs or beneficiaries according to the terms of those legal documents. Instead, it has become critically important for families to understand both the laws applicable to wills and trusts and the complex laws governing retirement plans. ...

All in the Family

Posted on: October 13th, 2020
The notion of fairness often pervades family dynamics and may continue even beyond death when decisions about dividing accounts and property arise. The law has attempted to address different notions of fairness with a variety of distribution strategies. Per stirpes, by representation, and per capita are key terms in wills and trust agreements that specify the way money and property are to be equitably divided. As you explore these distribution methods, observe how they achieve fairness in different ways and with different results....

What Happens If My Beneficiary Dies Before Me?

Posted on: September 30th, 2020
When planning for death, most people assume they will die before their beneficiaries (e.g., their spouse, children, and grandchildren). While these assumptions are often well-founded, they do not always come to pass. Sometimes a beneficiary of an estate or trust dies before the person leaving the inheritance. If this has happened to you, you may be wondering what is next. How does this event impact your original plans? The truth is, it depends on a number of factors. Lawyers call this scenario having a predeceased beneficiary. ...

How to Protect Your Significant Other from Frozen Accounts

Posted on: August 21st, 2020
​The death of a loved one is one of the most difficult times in a person’s life. Nothing can truly prepare a person for such a loss. However, dealing with the financial stress of frozen bank accounts can exacerbate the stress. Without proper planning, your significant other could struggle to gain access to your accounts. The frustration is especially distressing if the frozen account was the primary source for paying joint or household expenses....

Why Your Heirs or Beneficiaries May Receive a Smaller Inheritance Than You Thought

Posted on: August 17th, 2020
Often when a person dies and leaves money or property to heirs or beneficiaries, the first thing the heirs or beneficiaries want to know is the overall value of the estate. If the executor or the trustee (the person or entity in charge of handling the final affairs of a deceased person) shares that information, as is typically required, it can be tempting for heirs or beneficiaries to immediately do some quick mental math to estimate how much they will receive. With that number in mind, they may begin mentally spending the anticipated inheritance on things that have always been a little out of reach....
Posts: « Previous 1 ... 3 4 5 6 7 ... 19 Next » All