Thomas H. Sullivan

Attorney at Law

Trustees

Who Should Be Your Successor Trustee?

Posted on: January 24th, 2021
If you have a revocable living trust, you probably named yourself as the initial trustee so you can continue to manage your financial affairs. Eventually someone else will need to step in when you are no longer able to act due to incapacity or after your death, however. Your successor trustee plays an important role in the effective implementation of your estate plan....

How to Choose a Trustee

Posted on: January 18th, 2021
When you establish a trust, you name someone to be the trustee. A trustee does what you do right now with your financial affairs—collect income, pay bills and taxes, save and invest for the future, buy and sell property, provide for your loved ones, keep accurate records, and generally keep things organized and in good order....

The Importance of a Successor Trustee

Posted on: January 6th, 2021
An estate plan that includes a revocable living trust is an excellent way to protect yourself and your loved ones upon your passing or in the event you are unable to manage your own affairs. As opposed to other estate planning options, a revocable living trust gives you the ability to keep control of and enjoy your accounts and property during your lifetime and to maintain privacy in how the accounts and property are managed, and may save your loved ones the time and financial burden of going through probate....

Estate Planning After Personal Injury Settlements

Posted on: September 23rd, 2020
The U.S. legal system is designed so that those who suffer injury through the avoidable fault of others can seek compensation for those injuries. Sometimes injuries are so severe that the injured individual receives a significant sum of cash through a settlement or court judgement. Such a sudden and large infusion of cash can be overwhelming to an individual and the individual’s family, and without sound legal planning, can be lost or mishandled....

Why Your Heirs or Beneficiaries May Receive a Smaller Inheritance Than You Thought

Posted on: August 17th, 2020
Often when a person dies and leaves money or property to heirs or beneficiaries, the first thing the heirs or beneficiaries want to know is the overall value of the estate. If the executor or the trustee (the person or entity in charge of handling the final affairs of a deceased person) shares that information, as is typically required, it can be tempting for heirs or beneficiaries to immediately do some quick mental math to estimate how much they will receive. With that number in mind, they may begin mentally spending the anticipated inheritance on things that have always been a little out of reach....

Seven Ways to Avoid Family Fights over Your Property

Posted on: August 6th, 2020
Ask a group of friends if they have experienced a family fight over property after a loved one has died, and you will be in for a lively and eye-opening conversation. Far too many families end up fighting, or at least experiencing tension, over a family inheritance. But it does not have to be that way. Many families have worked through the details of divvying up a deceased loved one’s property remarkably well and ended up even closer. Having counseled families for years, we offer the following pearls of wisdom to help your family avoid fighting over your property when you are gone:...
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